My executive, masters, and undergraduate courses cover two primary topics: (1) strategic leadership and (2) social networks. Strategy courses focus on how to create and sustain advantages in highly competitive markets and industries.  Networks courses focus on how social structures shape incentives and behaviors, presenting opportunities to those who understand social networks and constraints to those who do not.  I also teach a doctoral seminar on organizational theory and executive sessions on corporate social responsibility.  Some descriptions and syllabi are available below.
 

Firm Analysis & Strategy    syllabus  [pdf]

This MBA core course covers concepts related to microeconomics and competitive strategy. Understanding microeconomic concepts allows managers to make better business decisions and better understand strategy's relationships with finance, marketing, human resource management, and operations. This course focuses primarily on managing the competitive position and long-term development of a business that creates and captures value in ways that enhance its long-run chances of success and survival.

 

Strategy & Organizational Leadership syllabus   [pdf]

This is an executive-level core course in strategy. Organizational leaders must formulate and implement strategies that place their organizations in advantageous positions relative to competitors. This course is consequently designed to enhance executives’ strategic leadership capabilities in industries increasingly characterized by technological and regulatory change, globalization, and demands for effective leadership. Strategic management is focused on how to create and sustain advantages in highly competitive business environments. We, therefore, cover qualitative and quantitative analytical frameworks for evaluating industry determinants of success and for formulating strategies that enable one’s organization to be more successful than competitors. Specifically, we consider internal and external factors that determine organizational chances of success; organizations’ positions relative to rivals; the resources and capabilities that organizations can leverage for competitive advantage; and evidence-based approaches to strategic management.

 

Strategic Leadership

BUS 631M Emory Goizueta syllabus  syllabus  [pdf]

XP 39802 Chicago Booth syllabus [pdf]

Leaders must coordinate activities among employees, between groups, and across organizations but executives are not always trained to do so.  This course prepares executives to lead organizations strategically by leveraging principles of evidence-based leadership and by managing networks of relationships. This course will enhance executive careers in two ways: (1) by preparing organizational leaders to design and implement strategic interventions that establish  results-based leadership credentials and (2) by providing a nuanced understanding of how networks can either aid or constrain leadership.  Applying key course principles in a variety of settings enhances leadership capabilities in industries increasingly characterized by technological and regulatory change, globalization, and demands for effective leadership.  

 

Organizing for High Performance   syllabus   [pdf]

To achieve individual and organizational performance objectives, executives and managers must coordinate activities among employees, between groups, and across organizations.  Generally, achievement depends upon both formal and informal aspects of any organization.  More specifically, this Executive MBA core course focuses on (1) how employee behaviors are shaped by organizational culture, policy, and structure and (2) how leaders can effectively form, manage, and lead high-performing individuals, teams, and organizations.  We will apply key organizing principles in a variety of settings with the goal of preparing executives to organize for high performance in industries increasingly characterized by technological change, globalization, and demands for corporate social responsibility. 

 

Networks & Organizations    syllabus   [pdf]

To achieve individual and organizational objectives, managers must coordinate activities among individuals, between groups, and across organizations. While human capital (i.e., what we know) certainly influences our potential to achieve objectives, actual achievement is just as likely (if not more likely) to be determined by our social capital (i.e., who we know). In short, effective management of social relationships (i.e., networks) is critical to business success. This MBA elective course focuses on (1) how incentives and behaviors are shaped by social structures and (2) how networks present opportunities and constraints to managers, companies, and entrepreneurs. By understanding principles of social capital, managers prepare themselves to identify effective ways to create and claim value in organizations and markets. Insights from this course will help managers generate promising career opportunities; form, manage, and lead high-performing teams and partnerships; and identify business opportunities to address market needs.

 

Strategic Management     syllabus   [pdf]

This undergraduate core course focuses on how to create and sustain advantages in highly competitive business environments.  We focus on analytical frameworks and techniques for evaluating business situations and for developing strategies to improve organizational chances of success.  Specifically, we consider the scope of a firm’s activities, the markets the firm does and does not serve, the resources the firm deploys, the internal and external factors that determine the firm’s chances of success, and the relationship between strategy and competitive advantage. Students adopt the perspective of a general manager (e.g., of a business unit, a plant, a region, a division, a product line, an entire company) focused on long-term profitability.   By considering business situations from the perspective of those who supervise work and lead employees, students are prepared to anticipate the most likely questions and concerns of senior executives making important business decisions. 

 

Organizational Theory    syllabus   [pdf]

This course is a research seminar in organizational theory for doctoral students in any Emory department. The course introduces students to the sociological study of organizations, with a particular emphasis on market-based settings.  Readings are drawn primarily from sociology but also from other disciplines.  To appreciate the objectives and contributions of organizational research one must develop familiarity with how organizational theory – and its various constituent theories and paradigms – evolved over time.  Therefore, we read and discuss both classic and contemporary work on organizations, their individual members, and the markets in which they participate. Seminar discussions focus on core theoretical propositions, logical reasoning, research design, standards of evidence, and the interpretation of empirical analyses.  Students will learn how organizational theory developed as a series of scholarly responses to previous organizational research and, hopefully, will acquire an appreciation for how the problems that interested early organizational scholars continue to challenge present-day researchers. Much like the field itself, the course will increasingly focus on empirical research (both qualitative and quantitative) over time.  Students should complete the course with an understanding of how to identify empirical settings and formulate research designs that lead to credible inferences about organizational theories.